People

Below is a list of individuals who do materials related research, along with their respective deparments and research interests.

Department

Name

Research Website and Interests

Chemical Engineering

William Pitt

Polymetric Biomaterials and Drug Deliveries

Chemical Engineering

Lon Cook

Tissue Engineering Lab: Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.  Current projects include heart, kidney, eye, pancreas, nerves, and blood vessels.

Chemistry

Roger Harrison

Harrison Lab Group: Research in our group comes under one of three main areas: molecular recognition, separations by ion chromatography and nanomaterials.  Frontiers in chemical research are at the interface of what used to be separate disciplines. The areas of inorganic chemistry, bioinorganic chemistry, and materials can be applied to separations, molecular sensors, catalysts, and nanomaterials. Our group does research in areas that span multiple fields of chemistry.

Chemistry

James Patterson

The Patterson Research Lab:  The goal of our research is to establish links between molecular structure and function in interfacial systems. To accomplish this, we use a non-linear spectroscopy technique known as vibrationally resonant sum-frequency generation (VR-SFG). This technique allows us to probe molecules at interfaces without interfering signal from molecules in the bulk. It also allows us to determine the orientation of molecules at these interfaces. We are currently studying two types of systems: solid-solid interfaces relevant to adhesion and solid-liquid interfaces relevant to chromatography.

Chemistry

Adam Woolley

Woolley Research Group: Nanomaterials and 3D printed materials. Current research involves folding DNA into controlled nanoscale designs that can be converted into functional electronic systems after metallization; and 3D printing of integrated microfluidic devices for biomarker analysis.

Chemistry

Richard Watt

Watt Research Lab Group: Biological systems require trace amounts of transition metal ions to sustain life. Transition metal ions are required at the active sites of many enzymes for catalytic activity.  In fact, transition metals catalyze some of the most energetically demanding reactions in biology.  Unfortunately, these highly reactive metal ions also catalyze reactions that are dangerous for biological systems, especially if the metal ion is free in solution. For this purpose biology has evolved elaborate transition metal ion handling systems to bind and sequester transition metal ions in non-reactive environments to prevent these dangerous reactions from occurring.  The Watt lab focuses on how iron is properly moved throughout the body.

Chemistry

David Michaelis

Michaelis Research Group: The Michaelis laboratory is interested in new strategies in catalyst development that provide solutions to some of the most challenging limitations of current organic synthesis.  Specifically, we develop heterobimetallic catalysts where formation of a metal–metal interaction is critical to catalyst performance.  We also develop polymer-supported nanoparticle catalysts where the polymer support acts as a tunable "ligand" to tune catalytic activity and selectivity.  We are also working to develop polypeptide-based multifunctional catalysts that mimic enzyme catalysts.

Chemistry

Kara Stowers

Stowers Lab Research: The Stowers laboratory takes an interdisciplinary approach towards research of carbon dioxide activation and reactivity through principles of inorganic, physical and organic chemistry. Our interest is in developing new catalysts that will decrease the energy and waste required to synthesize commodity chemicals through new pathways. 

Chemistry

Brian Woodfield

Woodfield Lab Group: The current research focus also includes the synthesis and characterization of a wide variety of alumina and titania catalyst supports and Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

Chemistry

Matt Linford

Linford Research Group: Most of our work is focused on surface modification and patterning of materials like silicon, polymers, and diamond. To do these surface modifications my students learn and perform bioconjugate chemistry, as well as organic and polymer chemistry.

Chemistry

Jeremy Johnson

Johnson Spectroscopy: We use ultrafast spectroscopy with expertise in high-field Terahertz (THz) generation to study characterize and control material properties on trillionth-of-a-second time scales.

Chemistry

Stacey Smith

XRD Research: The X-ray Diffraction (XRD) facility at BYU currently operates two XRD instruments. One instrument is optimized for analyzing polycrystalline samples (P-XRD), and the other is optimized for analyzing single crystal samples (SC-XRD). The XRD facility supports both research and teaching in the department and the university.

Electrical Engineering

Greg Nordin

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Electrical Engineering

Aaron Hawkins

Hawkins Research Group: See link for more information.

Electrical Engineering

Brian Mazzeo

Electromagnetic Measurement Group: See website for all research projects offered. 

Mechanical Engineering

David Fullwood

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Mechanical Engineering

Eric Homer

Microstructure Research: Structure-property relationships and microstructure evolution in polycrystalline metals; atomistic and mesoscale simulation techniques

Mechanical Engineering

Oliver Johnson

Johnson Group: The Johnson Group studies complex networks in materials. We investigate the influence of microstructural anisotropy, heterogeneity and topology on the properties of hard materials. We use theory, computation, and experiments to exploit these attributes of microstructures in an effort to design and synthesize materials with enhanced and/or tailored performance and to gain new insights into the relationships between the structure of materials and their properties.

Mechanical Engineering

Troy Munro

TEMP Lab: Building instruments and measuring the thermal behavior of materials, particularly in nuclear energy and bio-related systems.  Current research involves improved temperature control in microfluidic devices, fiber based thermal conductivity measurement systems for in-reactor use, a fluorescent scanning thermal microscope, and biomaterials for optical sensing.

Mechanical Engineering

Tracy Nelson

Friction Stir Research Lab: See link for more information.

Manufacturing Engineering Technology

Michael Miles

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Manufacturing Engineering Technology

Andy George

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Physics

John Colton

Colton Research Lab: Optical properties of semiconductors, including using optics to study electronic spin. Current materials being studied include semiconductor nanoparticles made inside the protein ferritin (with Richard Watt), platinum nanoparticles (with Richard Watt), p-type ZnO thin films (with David Allred), and nanoparticles as temperature sensors (with Troy Munro).

Physics

David Allred

Current Research: See website link for links to all current research projects (SOP for Uranium and Thorium thin film deposition, Optical Properties of Materials, Mars Exploration Simulation/Development). 

Physics

Brian Anderson

Acoustics Research: Experimental acoustics/ultrasonics to detect, locate, and characterize damage in materials. Research includes Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) to extract the stiffness tensor from dynamic excitation, Nonlinear RUS (NRUS) to detect microcracking, and time reversal acoustics to focus elastic energy for crack localization and characterization.

Physics

Gus Hart

Materials Simulation Group: Developing surrogate models to accelerate first-principles-based discovery of new materials. New mathematical representations for machine learning on computational databases of materials. Improvement and innovations in first-principles (quantum mechanical) simulations codes. Quantum-accurate interatomic potentials. Molecular dynamics, phonon calculations, nested sampling for temperature-composition phase diagrams. Machine learning for grain boundaries. High-throughput materials discovery and database building (www.aflow.org). New ternary bases for superalloys.

Physics

Branton Campbell

Branton Campbell Research: I apply state-of-the-art x-ray and neutron scattering techniques to study local and long-range structures in a variety of complex solids, including fast-ion conductors, ferroelectric relaxors, high-temperature superconductors, and colossal magnetoresistive manganites, where nanoscale structural features influence macroscopic physical properties.

Physics

Karine Chesnel

Nano-Magnetism: We investigate the magnetic behavior of nanosystems, such as magnetic nanoparticles and very thin magnetic films. 

Physics

Robert Davis

BYU Applied Nanomaterials: We focus on nanoscale science, with an emphasis on carbon nanotubes and their respective uses. 

Physics

Richard Vanfleet

Vanfleet Research:  We attempt to determine in as direct observational way as possible the way materials actually chose to arrange themselves. This is often in contrast to how man has attempted to arrange them. We are interested in the structural arrangement of atoms as well as the elemental and bonding arrangements of atoms within nanometer scale features of the sample.

Physics

Steve Turley

X-Ray Optics Research: I am working on a project with Prof. David Allred and a group of undergraduate and graduate students that began with designing and testing a mirror for the Medium Exploror (MIDEX) Program. Our mirror was part of a device for imaging the upper atmosphere from space at a wavelength of 304 Angstroms. The mirror we designed was to have a relatively high reflectivity at 304 Angstroms (>20%) and a low reflectivity at 584 Angstroms (<0.2%). The research involves computer aided optical design, multi-layer mirror fabrication, measurement of optical properties of materials, and design and fabrication of test and measurement components.